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Research

Satellite Aided Inertial Navigation System with Adaptive Mixing

Principal investigator: Ranjan VEPA

Fig. 4 Errors in the components of the simulated and the estimated attitude quaternion over a time frame of 1440 minutesIn this research an adaptive unscented Kalman filter based mixing filter is used to develop a low cost satellite aided inertial navigation system. Using just six accelerometers and an altimeter, in addition to a set of typical pseudo-range estimates that can be obtained from a satellite navigation system such GPS or GLONASS, the feasibility of generating estimates of the typical outputs that can be obtained from the inertial navigation system is demonstrated. The methodology may be developed as a stand-alone system or employed in conjunction with a traditional strapped down inertial navigation systems for purposes of initial alignment. Moreover the feasibility of employing adaptive mixing facilitates the possibility of using the system in an interoperable fashion with satellite navigation measurements.
An adaptive unscented Kalman filter based mixing filter is used to develop a high-precision kinematic satellite aided inertial navigation system with a modern receiver that incorporates carrier phase smoothing and ambiguity resolution. Using carrier phase measurements with multiple antennas, in addition to a set of typical pseudo-range estimates that can be obtained from a satellite navigation system such GPS or GLONASS, the feasibility of generating high precision estimates of the typical outputs from an inertial navigation system is demonstrated. The methodology may be developed as a stand-alone system or employed in conjunction with a traditional strapped down inertial navigation systems for purposes of initial alignment. Moreover the feasibility of employing adaptive mixing facilitates the possibility of using the system in an interoperable fashion with satellite navigation measurements.
Related Publication: “High-Precision Kinematic Satellite and Doppler Aided Inertial Navigation System,” Royal Institute of Navigation’s The Journal of Navigation, Vol. 64, No. 01, pp. 91-108, Jan., 2011.