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Queen Mary University of LondonQueen Mary University of London
Staff menu

Dr Vanira Trifiletti
PhD

 
Dr Trifiletti
Position: Marie Sklodowska Curie Fellow
Supervisor: Dr Oliver Fenwick
Tel: +44 (0)20 7882 3604
Email: v.trifiletti@qmul.ac.uk
Location: 323, Engineering,
Networks:
Expertise: Nanostructured materials for renewable energy applications: photovoltaic and thermoelectric devices. Chemical and physical synthesis of single crystals and thin films, material characterisation, device construction and testing.

Brief Biography

Dr Vanira Trifiletti completed an MSc at the University of Milano - Bicocca in Materials Science, which ended studying photovoltaic devices based on organic dyes. Following this, she worked as a Research Fellow at the Solar Energy MIB-SOLAR Centre (University of Milano - Bicocca) for ENI S.p.A., on the project "Photosensitizers for organic dye-sensitised solar cells", until she started her PhD in Nanotechnology at Center for Biomolecular Nanotechnologies, Italian Institute of Technology, Lecce. Vanira focused on the evolution of the third generation photovoltaics, from dye-sensitized to perovskite solar cells, investigating the physical chemistry of both devices. Upon completion of her PhD, fall 2016, Dr Trifiletti moved back to the Materials Science Department of University of Milano - Bicocca, where she worked as Research fellow on the development of growth processes for inorganic solar cells based on chalcogenides and related tandem cells. In 2018, she was awarded a two-year European Commission Marie Curie Fellowship to pursue new thermoelectric materials, specifically hybrid organic-inorganic perovskites, joining Dr Fenwick's research team. Until February 2021, she is a Research Assistant at the School of Engineering and Materials Science, Queen Mary University of London, and her current research is focussed on investigating doping in hybrid organic-inorganic perovskites to boost their thermoelectric performance.